Wednesday, June 27, 2007



















Here richly, with ridiculous display

The Politician's corpse was laid away.
While all of his acquaintance sneered and slanged
I wept. For I had longed to see him hanged.

28 comments:

Pete said...

The more he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson-

ian said...

Heard he is converting to Catholicism? Bit of a variation on "Christian Socialism".

Sam Dodsworth said...

Ian:

Not really. Liberation Theology started in the Catholic Church. The only problem is that the current Pope isn't a big fan. And that Tony Blair's no longer a socialist, of course.

Sam Dodsworth said...

pete:

Surely the problem with Blair was that he genuinely believed his intentions were honourable? He would have been as dangerous as Thatcher if he'd only had a clear idea of what his intentions actually were...

Tpolg said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tpolg said...

And all this time I thought you were opposed to capital punishment, or was it simply murder you had in mind?

John said...

I see you guys are just as capable of turning on the people you elect as we are on the other side of the Atlantic. Sad.

Pandora Caitiff said...

John (post above) appears to be under the mistaken impression that we have only just turned on Mr B-Liar.

And the mistaken impression that Dubya was "elected".

Tpolg said...

My dear Miss Caitiff, since you obviously such an expert on our Constitutional process, perhaps you would not mind expounding your knowledge on this matter for us?

Chris said...

John, when those we have elected grievously disappoint us, we change our minds about them. What do you do?

John said...

Pandora,

The electoral system is designed to give less populous parts of the country somewhat more say in elections. This prevents the whole country from having to automatically do whatever New York City wants.

Chris,

I first ask myself whether the reason that I am "grievously disappointed" is because the leader has somehow changed since I elected him, or whether I'm just blindly believing what the biased media tells me to. It's usually the latter.

Sam Dodsworth said...

pete:

If there's one thing we've learned from Tony Blair, it's that a competent leader knows how to manage the media.

Andrew Rilstone said...

I am extremely offended and cross at the libelous suggestion that I have changed my mind about Tony Blair. I have never voted for Tony Blair, and I have never voted for any Labour candidate since he has been party leader. I have hated his public school guts ever since as shadow home secretary he nailed himself TO James Bulger's hearse and started making moronic suggestions about banning videos. (Videos were things we had in those days. They were a bit like DVDS.) I attach a link to the first thing I ever wrote about the insane, lying, war-mongoring, bush toadying little murdoch drone.

http://www.rilstone.talktalk.net/tony.htm

Andrew Rilstone said...

Famous political leader. Everyone thinks he's a goody. Secret follower of the Bishop of Rome. Starts big war in Babylon. 12 hours out of office, goes off to take up new post in Jerusalem.

Just saying.

Andrew Rilstone said...

And all this time I thought you were opposed to capital punishment, or was it simply murder you had in mind?

I believe that Mr. Belloc's first draft of the poem went:

"While all of his acquaintance swore once and slighted four more times
I wept, for I had longed to see him indicted for war crimes."

Andrew Rilstone said...

The British electoral system, in practice if not on paper, is not that different from the US one. When we elect a "Member of Parliament", we are effectively appointing a delegate to cast a vote for Prime Minister on our behalf. Because some parts of the country are more densely populated than others, a single M.P may represent 10,000 or 100,000 votes. As in America, it is perfectly possible for one party to have a majority of MPs without having a majority of the popular vote. I believe that this was the case with Major's second government.

The main difference is that in the UK, we count all the votes.

Except in Scotland, obviously.

Phil Masters said...

The electoral system is designed to give less populous parts of the country somewhat more say in elections.

This is nice provided that you think that rural people are entitled to a larger say in government than urban people. I'm not quite sure why this should be desirable. No doubt they have the right to be protected from the tyranny of the majority, but then so do a lot of other minorities.

You could design systems that give unique special privileges to particular minority religions, or ethnic groups, or old age pensioners, or redheads, or homosexuals, or inner city tower-block dwellers, or science fiction fans. One way you could do so quite easily is by making their votes count for more in a democracy. But nobody seems likely to argue that this is a good idea. The inhabitants of thinly-populated geographical areas, on the other hand, often have privileges sanctified by time, which makes them sacred.

(The funny thing is, British political history includes an example of geographical privileges that were left unadjusted until the results were hilariously funny but nothing to do with democracy. As that eventually had to be fixed, a century and a half or so ago, we do have a system which, despite all its numerous flaws, at least allows for constituency boundary adjustments as a routine matter. Despite which, we still get quite a lot of government by parties with minority support - and, the Tory tabloids would say with a little justice, we've ended up privileging Scots voters to so extent. Hey ho.)

ian said...

Mr. dodsworth:
Was not referring to the general state of being both Christian, & Socialist (both of which I happen to be, in spite of High Church affiliation), but the Nonconformist/Low Church tradition that Blair has tried to exploit; a tradition, by the way, passed on to the US branch of Methodism Bush JR. claims as his moral base. (Yes, there have been complaints).

Not that one does not welcome any reminder that Catholicism does not have to be what is currently considered "right".
Even if its Jesuittical;)

ian said...

Danish system does have direct representation (I think its called): plauged by host of minority parties, many of them tending towards oppertunism, and hence fascism, as result.

John said...

All the comments about the failings of our electoral systems are true. That is why we Christians in America are busily trying to establish a theocracy. I, myself, am to be named secretary of chocolate production and motorcycle testing in the new regime.

Tpolg said...

Contrary to popular urban legend, the Senate and electoral college, were designed to give rural areas more say in elections (just look at Road Island and Delaware, both have disproportional representation though they have very little rural area) but was rather part of the original system of checks and balances of republican government, under the old Republic, before the dark times, before the Empire.

apophasis said...

As to what Andrew was just saying: http://kenmacleod.blogspot.com/2007/06/antichrist-role-could-hinder-blairs.html

And damn it John, I though I had that position locked down!

Andrew said...

Blair is no longer Prime Minister. Just rejoice at that news. Rejoice! Rejoice!

John said...

Tplog,

Don't you just love that word, "Senate"? So magisterial. So Roman. Unlike "parliament", which smacks of Picts painting themselves blue.

Phil Masters said...

Personally, I think we should be Icelandic about this, and call it The Thing.

Andrew said...

So, when tourists come to London, we show them our thing.

Pandora Caitiff said...

Cheers for the Pol/Sci lesson John. My grasp of the US electoral process is rudimentary at best :)

I was just making a cheap joke about the Florida voting irregularities. I hope I haven't offended your country too much!

Although as a Christian I presume you'll forgive me..

Chris said...

It occurs to me that if one must quote Belloc on this occasion, this is probably more appropriate:

The accursèd power which stands on Privilege
(And goes with Women, and Champagne and Bridge)
Broke - and Democracy resumed her reign:
(Which goes with Bridge, and Women and Champagne).